MongoDB Utils

So, I managed to

a) Clone the SD cards with a successful MongoDB installation
b) Reformat the WinXP Dell to Debian 6.0 and install MongoDB
c) Plug everything into a new 8-port ethernet switch
d) Install PuTTY

…Which should mean I have at least 5 nodes in an available cluster (+ VMs on the Dell). I was just about to install MongoVue on the Dell (which is now becoming the master/control machine) and connect to each node from within MongoVue and browse collections made on each device  – only to find out it runs only on Windows!

In browsing to see if there was a linux version of MongoVue I stumbled across this excellent blog / summary of what’s out there

http://timgourley.com/2010/03/16/tuesday-night-tech-mongodb-ui-edition.html

This tool looks pretty cool for administering clustersImageI’ll give it a shot.

DavidHows @10Gen also recommended that I installed MMS. This is an agent (or python daemon) which polls the internal performance metrics out of your Mongo instances. Its free and is a great help if you’re trying to diagnose performance issues. This should be useful for me, as I’m interested in ETL performance (throughput) depending on how many nodes I have, how the data is sharded, size and type of SD cards etc.

http://www.10gen.com/products/mms
By default, the MMS dashboard displays 9 metrics:

  • Op Counters – Count of operations executed per second
  • Memory – Amount of data MongoDB is using
  • Lock Percent – Percent of time spent in write lock
  • Background Flush – Average time to flush data to disk
  • Connections – Number of current open connections to MongoDB
  • Queues – Number of operations waiting to run
  • Page Faults – Number of page faults to disk
  • Replication – Oplog length (for primary) and replication delay to primary (on secondary)
  • Journal – Amount of data written to journal

 

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2 thoughts on “MongoDB Utils

  1. Pingback: MongoDB Database Monitoring | mongopi

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